gem shaker machine


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read an article 20+years ago in Lost Treasure magazine about a group of elderly men, one who's name was Carl Fischer and they made a device that you would shovel ground material on (it had an angled screen) and various gems, by their weight would bounce up toward the top. The used to sell the plans to make it for $10. Any one heard of it?

Found this site by accident. I have the orginal course called: "Duke's Short Coarse On Prospecting And Mineral Identification" I was 13 years old and sent him $5 for his kit and booklets. Never used it but still have it and will keep it. Anyone else heard of it? I was thinking of taking some pictures of it and posting them here if anyone was interested. DAN

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Hello Dan,

Thanks for joining the forums. I received your email and will reply back. You asked if Hardrock Bob is still around. I seen him about a year ago down in Southern Arizona. He's a great guy to talk to. I'm sure he browses the forums still. Hardrock, you still out there?

I never seen the device you're talking about, but would assume it's some type of jig system. However, a jig shakes the heavier material to the bottom, not to the top. I'm trying to figure out what device you're talking about.

If you have a picture of the unit I would love to see it.

Thanks for joining and hope to see you contributing more in the near future.

Rob Allison

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carl fischer was a prominent prospector in the 1970's..he used to write in alot of the treasure magazines...you could probably contact some of the treasure mags and see if they have any contact info for him..he may still be alive...in the late 70's or early 80's he and 2 of his partners hit a big payday somewhere near yuma..north of yuma if i recall...they pulled 760 oz's out of a small tributary wash

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Gems bouncing up towards the top? Not quite. Most gems are heavy and the reason that some come up as ingredients in Black Sand.

In Nam and other places, Colombia too, they have a different sort of gold pan called a batea, which is a large 16"-20" diameter steel, with a pronounced indent at the bottom.

For gemstones, they use a straw batea, sort of like a chinaman's hat. shovel in dirt, and holding it with the widest part up, pump it up and down in, or just below water level. After a dozen or so pumps, in one swift motion, you turn it upside down and dump it's contents. Any gems that, by gravity, were in the bottom of the cone, will now be on the top of the dumped load, and an easy thing thing to pick up.

A lot of corundums (Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires) as well as topaz and other stones are regularly mined this way.

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carl fischer was a prominent prospector in the 1970's..he used to write in alot of the treasure magazines...you could probably contact some of the treasure mags and see if they have any contact info for him..he may still be alive...in the late 70's or early 80's he and 2 of his partners hit a big payday somewhere near yuma..north of yuma if i recall...they pulled 760 oz's out of a small tributary wash

Whats4supper, here you go. Brand new 16" Batea here in Brazil. Last week watched a 72 year old prospector work this pan and was he ever fast.

post-719-1150750441_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

read an article 20+years ago in Lost Treasure magazine about a group of elderly men, one who's name was Carl Fischer and they made a device that you would shovel ground material on (it had an angled screen) and various gems, by their weight would bounce up toward the top. The used to sell the plans to make it for $10. Any one heard of it?

Found this site by accident. I have the orginal course called: "Duke's Short Coarse On Prospecting And Mineral Identification" I was 13 years old and sent him $5 for his kit and booklets. Never used it but still have it and will keep it. Anyone else heard of it? I was thinking of taking some pictures of it and posting them here if anyone was interested. DAN

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Dan: About a gem shaker machine, it works on the principle of a higher specific

gravity material, like gemstones traveling farther than a material like ordinary rocks, since they have a higher inertia. The shaker bed is approx. 15 degrees slope uphill with a screen bed to screen out the sand. This machine was designed for gemstones and not gold since all the fine gold would be screened out, this could be recovered later with a "bowl" machine. The "bed" is shaken with a eccentric cam driven by a small gas engine in a circular motion so that the upstroke and forward portion of the motion "throws" the heavy items forward and uphill. The desirable items will collect first at the top of the screen area where they can be cleaned off. Hope this helps. JAT

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We knew a guy who made something kind of like what you are describing, it would shake up and down under water and all the gravel and gems were sealed in a screen surrounded by a car tire, he would take out the screen and flip it upside down and the gems would all be neatly centered and concentrated lining the bottom (when it was flipped upside down they would be on top). This was in North Carolina. One can do that by hand, but of course it is more laborious. I would take a screen and shake it up and down, then back and forth and side to side (four directions) under water and it would do the same thing. I think they often use a similar process in Montana for sapphire prospecting.

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