"WHAT DID I FIND?"


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Dear Rob;

Are they pottery fragments? I know that some fragments chirp here if the clay used is of a certain composition. Also, the newer pottery fragments REALLY sound off if they happened to use some sort of lead based glaze to decorate them with. Also old glass with sound off too if is composed of lead glass, like old window panes fragments or old electrical insulators.

Your friend;

LAMAR

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Yup, had the same thing happen. Even down near Vail AZ. on my Mom's property, where ther is very little mineralisation. Maybe they all bought there clay from the same place :P I hope the Fed's don't catch on to this, they'll try to charge us with pot hunting :angry: Later...Jim P.

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Dear group;

It seems that Rob is going to leave us in suspense as to the composition of these objects. I still think that they are pottery fragments and I am hoping that I am wrong so I can learn something new.

Your friend;

LAMAR

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Hello All,

Sorry it took a bit too long to get back with you. Yes, they are pottery shards. I believe I seen a small Indian type foundation on the next ridge, but was too lazy to check it out. I don't like to disturb the Indian relics, they are amazing people and I really respect them. Just wanted to let you know that pottery shards can be found with a metal detector. I know several locations where there are tons of shards and even some very old foundations. However, I would never tell a sole!

Take care,

Rob Allison

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Dear Req;

I am very curious to know why certain pottery pieces sound off to a detector and other pieces don't. About a year ago I cornered a member of an archelogical dig team and of course I immediately began peppering him with questions about various types of equipment they used, methods, etc. I mentioned to him that I stumbled across what seems to be the remains of a very old camp and I located it from the carbon deposits and pottery fragments. I then showed him the location on a map and he promised to look into it. Then I started asking him why pottery bits give off such a strong signal and he stated that it was his experience that pottery which had been fired in a kiln oven sounded off whereas pottery which was hardened by the sun would not. The reason wny this is has always eluded me and I would very much appreciate you shedding some light on this phenomenom. Thank you in advance for all of your great efforts at teaching us about the world of PI detectors.

Your friend;

LAMAR

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Hi Lamar,

The response you got about which type of pottery will sound off is correct. The pieces that are heat or kiln dried will generally be the ones that do sound off.

One of the main reasons this is true is, generally speaking, most clay has different levels of iron oxides embedded in it. The brown or orange color are general indicators.

Now, this iron oxide by itself is not that bad and will not cause an extreme problem. However, when you heat the same iron oxide sufficiently, it is transformed into maghemite, which does cause a very strong response.

Now, it is possible that lightening strikes could generate the tremendous heat necessary, which could cause isolated pockets that respond differently than surrounding areas. So, this could explain some of the unexplainable situations where we hear "ghost" signals.

Also, if you have ever passed a PI coil over old red bricks, you will find that some of them will generate a very strong response. This is because of the iron oxide used to create the color of the brick. Generally, very red bricks will have heavier concentrations of iron oxide. Once the brick is kiln dried, the brick can become a strong signal, depending upon the amount of iron oxide present. I mentioned this because there are times when a person may want to simulate really hot ground and they do not have a piece of basalt available. In such cases, one can use an old red brick as a test piece.

BTW, my first knowledge of why bricks or even the ground around campfires can generate a strong signal was because of a discussion by Eric Foster on the subject. So, he is the one who really provided me with the answer. His williness to share information sure makes a dummy like me look smart at times.

Reg

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metal oxides, when fired, interact with clays to produce ceramic, and the recipes can be very durable, or very brittle. Also of concern is the kiln temperature and duration of firing.

Some pottery can be a lot more durable, or glassy than other, and variations follow one culture's work com[ared to that of another.

The uranium oxides found in several types of pottery, are, for the most part, of negligible radiation. Ashen coleman lantern mantles usually throw off more radiation. But a metal detector is after metal, and oxides form a purer mass than others, distributed throughout the object (sort of like a stony meteorite or hot rock, or volcanic rock). To make pure uranium metal takes something like 30,000 tons of really highgrade pitchblend to make 50 pounds of actual metal.

While reporting shards and native american campsites may go against the policy of a gold hunter, if there are petroglyphs around, perhaps an exception should be made (you do what you want to do).

While on the subject, there are a number of detectorists that search for old chinese graveyards, as the custom is/was to bury the dead with a gold coin of gold jewelry placed on the forehead or base of the skull. Personally, I am not about messing up an old grave, treasure or not, but know of a few people that do this sort of thing. I am the sort that will tell someone about the skeleton or site, but there are other things that I overlook because most of the archaeo bit is a propaganda ploy to control access and tie up land.

Besides, you would be surprised how many Indians and bonafide study groups just really don't want to know. About 15 years ago, two miles from my house, I discoved a paiute pit house, and camp area used for hunting. In one of the washes nearby, I also found a compete human skeleton and a partial one, including two skulls and hair. I went to every academic and Indian council I could find and no one wanted to know anothing about it. The whole area has since been plowed under and made into a housing tract.

Which helped me because I no longer have this conscience thing when coming across other stuff. Generally, in my opinion, foundations will use the finds and location to get publicity and donations, stop a developer with obstruction tactics (as in Nature's Conservancy or Sieera Club), or use the information for extortion, in order to get prime real estate elsewhere in exchange. Nothing ever happens for the right reasons; rather it happens dependent on who will get the padded palm.

So look over the area, take notes, simple survey. Maybe somewhere down the road you can use it for barter. Why reveal all the cards and be dealt out of the game?

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