Metal dectors


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Hello Musstag,

The different numbers you're asking about are operating frequencies. The Garrett Scorpion runs on 15Khz and the Fisher Goldbug2 runs on 71kHz. There is no question, go for the Fisher Goldbug2! Not knocking Garrett, but the Scorpion is nothing compared to the Fisher Goldbug2 in my opinion. A matter of fact, I don't know anyone using a Garrett Scorpion to hunt for nuggets.

If you can afford the Fisher, I would recommend that unit. You might even consider an original Fisher Goldbug, which would be even cheaper than the GB2.

Thanks for joining the forums and hope I was able to help a bit,

Rob Allison

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you know, ihad a gold bug 2 for a while and found it just didnt penetrate highly mineralised ground more than an inch or two! I tried all differnt types of setting and it just didnt have it in it. I found alot of lead (bullets) and square nails between 6 inches and surface, but never any deeper.

dont get me wrong, it was still alot of fun. ( THE SURCH IS WHAT ITS ALL ABOUT!!!!!)

Im still looking for that sd2200 intrade for dredge B)

BEST OF LUCK TO EVERYONE

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Well I'll chime in here. I have both. I have found nuggets with the Garrett, but my weapon of choice is the GB2. If your just starting out and not sure which one you want, well talk to Rob here on the forum about the X-Terra 70. Its probably in the same price range as the GB2.

Bob

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Hello Airboy,

Well I was a Fisher Metal Detector Dealer for many years and I would have to agree with you. The Fisher Goldbug2 is extemely sensitivity, but there are also disadvantages of this. Out here in the West, most of the gold bearing areas are loaded with iron mineralization. This can be in the form of Ironstones, Black Sands, Iron rich soils & FeroMag minerals in the country rock. With this being said, you have to back down your sensitivity to elliminate the ground noise. Some prefer to crank the settings to the highest level and hunting with the searchcoil off the ground a bit. This technique is called "cuffing the coil." Many really old VLF Pro's use this technique with good success.

Unfortunately a VLF can only do so much in mineralized areas. This is where the PI's (Pulse Induction) detectors really excel. ;)

Take care,

Rob Allison

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Hey, Thanks guys, didn't expect fast response, yall must have a busy site, I will look around it more. I'm in South Alabama, I go to NE Ga often, Clayton, Dahlonga, have not prospected b4, thought I'd check into it to have something else to do when We go vist my wifes family summer home in Clayton. I guess the $470 for the Garrett vs about 650 to the Fisher is not much difference if the Fisher is better, the Garret has stated a 2 year warranty also saw a five yr, The Fisher comes with a limited Life time warranty. If spending 470 might a well spring for a couple hunderd more maybe better resale if I want to give it up. NOW, what about the size coil to use... 10" Vs the 6" coil, for nuggets hunting around north GA.?'

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Hello Airboy,

The Minelab PI's (Pulse Induction) are very immune to mineralization and get up to 2-3 times the depth over a VLF (Very Low Frequency) detector. This is why serious nugget hunters use them.

How a PI Works in a NutShell -

PI systems may use a single coil as both transmitter and receiver, or they may have two or even three coils working together. This technology sends powerful, short bursts (pulses) of current through a coil of wire. Each pulse generates a brief magnetic field. When the pulse ends, the magnetic field reverses polarity and collapses very suddenly, resulting in a sharp electrical spike. This spike lasts a few microseconds (millionths of a second) and causes another current to run through the coil. This current is called the reflected pulse and is extremely short, lasting only about 30 microseconds. Another pulse is then sent and the process repeats. A typical PI-based metal detector sends about 100 pulses per second, but the number can vary greatly based on the manufacturer and model, ranging from a couple of dozen pulses per second to over a thousand.

The sampling circuit sends the tiny, weak signals that it monitors to a device call an integrator. The integrator reads the signals from the sampling circuit, amplifying and converting them to direct current (DC). The direct current's voltage is connected to an audio circuit, where it is changed into a tone that the metal detector uses to indicate that a target object has been found.

PI-based detectors are not very good at discrimination because the reflected pulse length of various metals are not easily separated. However, they are useful in many situations in which VLF-based metal detectors would have difficulty, such as in areas that have highly conductive material in the soil or general environment. A good example of such a situation is salt-water exploration. Also, PI-based systems can often detect metal much deeper in the ground than other systems.

Take care,

Rob Allison

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In addition to the size coil to use, I guess I should have asked (since we're up to 6 or 700 bucks) about the Terso Lobo or whatever model is the Nugget dectector. Is the gold bug 2 better? I'll also look into the Minelabs models, and the org. Gold Bug. Remember, I'm trying to use this in North Georgia.

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since you are going to be in North Georgia you might want to consider a more all purpose type of detector such as the Minelab X-terra 70 which you can use for gold detection as well as relic hunting. Seems to be getting some good reviews. Most gold detectors are pretty specialized to gold. Also you may want to consider some other method for gold prospecting in GA such as starting with a sluice and a pan and working in creeks.

Another thing is you don't have the extensive BLM land areas in GA like you do out west. Using a metal detector in a National Forest for mineral recovery is ok but most Forest Service folks will accuse you of hunting for archaelogical items which will lead to problems with them. Just a couple of things to think about.

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Just to muddy the waters......have you thought about a Minelab Eureka Gold beeper? 3 switchable frequencies, Minelab quality, ground balancing manual or toggle slow/fast auto, good for gold prospecting especially or coins/relics/jewelry (but it's real darn sensitive and sounds off on everything at parks and playgrounds, so be prepared to dig, dig, DIG! LOL).

I got one from Rob and wowzers! What a machine, what a deal, what a great forum!

HH, ya'll!

Kajun

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Yep, I have plans to do some panning. I'll rig up a sluice box. I read some stories where in th 1800's I guess it was, gold was picked up off the ground around Dahlonega. Got to thinking, Durn, may be some more an inch or two down.... Maybe I need some type of Detector.

Heres a story for ya. Years ago, Visiting a Nation Historic Oak in Blakley Al. some guys had a divining rod set up on a long spring, with a wad of gold near the end. There are tales of Gold being buried around the old Court House which was now gone, but it was near the Big Oak. Well I helped them we took two devine reading about 50 yards on either side of the big Oak, (I held it once, it would sway and try to swing to a direction....) and had one guy walk the line and we determined a crossing point, like an X between the two readings and it was close to the Tree. Well about that time some squirel hunters starting shooting, and my wife got scared and so we left. They stayed, the gold seekers. I Went back the next day and found a 1 1/2 foot deep hole dug at the X spot and at the bottom was a Square impression about 8 inches sq,and about 6 inces deep, Like if a box had been removed....... I guess I missed out on spliting up the Gold!

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I've heard of at least one small commerical placer mine that was operating just a few years ago around Dahlonega. It may still be in production for all I know. They use a backhoe and move alot of red Georgia clay in the mining process. Most of the gold as you mentioned is quite small, very occasionally some decent sized nuggets are still found.

Rex

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I've ordered the AL. Ga. maps from Big Ten Inc. Its too list all old mines and some are on National Forrest lands, they say, about 100 in Al. and 400 or more in Ga. It might be interesting. From a Reg. I found at a Gov. web site www.ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/ on and on with /'s it sez gold panning and metal detecting is allowed in National Forrest. But the people at the Smokeys web site say its not allowed in the Smokey Mt National Park...? and Ga. sez its not allowed on State Parks. The Crisson Mine near Cleveland Ga. , near Dahlonega, sells concerate for panning 7 days a week every day except Christmas. Boxed to go or do it there. I'll try some next time we go up there. The old Loud Mine is near or is on a National Forrest area. A club called the Ga. weekenders or something like that have several properties, one a few miles from that mine, panning allowed, 3 month pass/use for 3 months, 90 bucks. I know of lseveral small to medium watrefalls that I can get to in Nationial Forrest areas that might be interesting, Lots of Big rocks just b4 the falls and not too deep at the bottom, but some over my head and Ice Cold even in the summer.

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Just about every gold detector has its niche, and its failures. I have a GB2, and some others. The reason for higher operating frequency in a gold rig is that natural gold doesn't create many aberrations in low frequency rigs, like that of alloys, coins, jewelry, and iron. Another problem is penetration in mineralized soil that allows the coil to 'see' downward, but also filters out unwanted iron and metals that set off the detector's filters.

Doesn't really matter where or how you look, you'll also have to confront trash, whether from this century or ages past. The fact that you are finding lead or hobnails is a pretty good sign that your rig is tuned right, and also a pretty good sign that your search area doesn't have natural gold of a size you would rather find, if using a relic detector. If using a gold shooter and you are finding this sort of stuff, plan on digging a lot of trash, but you are also tuned in to find gold and if it is there and within a foot or so of the surface, you will find it.

Larger coils punch deeper, but can ignore smaller nuggets. Small coils work best in trashy areas. all coils must pass directly over a detectable object for the detector to sense it. A detector isn't a magnet that will pick up stuff off to the side.

Minelabs are top of the line PI detectors, and for a starter, go with a GB2 or a LoboTrac. A white's spectrum programmable rig can also yield treasure, but all of these units have limits, and only personal experience, good wide range headphones, and lots of testing and use will bring you to understand what exactly you want in a detector, then you can go on to the next level.

For GA or AL, You may want a relic detector to filter out trash, and a dual-use one Gold and Relics/Coins. With a decent relic detector, you will locate some gold. Once you find a few nicks of gold, buy or rent a gold shooter and rework the area for additional rewards.

Like laying block, you have to build a few fences to get your craft down, and figure out what works best for the goals you have. Marry a decent detector and fugure out what your goals are after you get some basic experience

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you can also try GPAA they have some georgia claims and also www.nuggethunters.org for the Georgia Gold Prospectors web site

I did join the Gpaa,, one claim in Ga. Close to west central Ga. The other GA sites, 5 or 6 are National Forrest Locations in the North as I expected they might be, but thats ok, thats enuff, and I enjoy Tom on the Gold Fever Show, and I get a nice pan and abunch of stuff. And those site are close to where I go, In fact one is about where I was planning to go.

Looked at the GGpa site, don't know... the talk in the forums about the amt of gold was dis-apointing scarce to my way of thinking. Not much Metal detecting talk, They seem to pan and run dredges and a Trommel.

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Whats4supper, thats some good thoughts... I'll keep those in mine, I especially like the idea of reworking a area that something has been found on later with better equip. Actually, I stared thinking just sluice and panning, But I got to thinking, heck with these new age detectors, there could be losta gold missed in some of those areas where they stubbed their toe on it in GA. And a lot of homes and roads are being built all over the Mtns. now a days and that has caused a lot of run off of new material into the streams.

OH!! let me ask yall, some of the sites mentioned ' placer' gold found in the gravel beds of streams.... whats that mean? How do you work a site like that? Placer gold? Besides working MD's around the areas you might think it was coming from?l

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Hello Musstag,

"Placer Gold" is gold that has erroded away from the source (Lode). Most of your placer gold can be found in dry or wet washes, creeks & rivers. Most of these type of deposits are called "Alluvial placer deposits." There are also "Elluvial" or "Residual" deposits, and these are usually on hillsides and benches below where the original source was.

Fines, Flakes and Nuggets are all Placer Gold.

Hope this helps a bit, just woke up. :huh:

Rob Allison

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placer (plasser) gold is the form of choice for most detectorists- natural gold found in small chips or globulets, usually alloyed with silver, copper, or other elements. When you find this, take note of the shape and color as these give you some idea of the purity, and how far the gold travelled from the source. Rougher, and crystal imprints mean the source may be nearby (though under the surface, or up on a hillside). Rounded or smooth nuggets means it has travelled far from its source. Many times, placer gold may not have a source, being a product of extensive erosion from veins or land no longer in place, and higher than the existing mountains.

While gold can be found in most all rocky states, placer gold deposits are at a premium. For this reason, I suggested that perhaps you would be better off with a dual purpose rig, because where you are, there are war relics, old coins, buried money and pirate booty, coins and jewelry on the shore or in a swimming pond, and other areas that would yield treasure, though not neccesarily natural placer gold. Many top of the line current detectors can fill your bill, some will even indicate what you found and how deep it is.

Many of the goldshooter detectors are based solely on sound, and what sounds the machine gives off, indicate precise details about your target. It is up to you to figure out what the sounds mean, in all their variances. Other factors that hinder the operator is hearing ability (deafness), and local conditions, weather, overhead power lines, water/rain, litter, and area history. Many sites that would be desirable to search may be locked up in private ownership, and the owner may not want anyone with a detector poking around, or it may be part of an archaeological site or some other closed area.

For starters, perhaps you should subscribe to Lost Treasure, and Eastern and Western treasures, even look into joining a metal detecting/mining/relic club where you can get immediate personal instruction and feedback. A club can bring you up to speed, as well as share with you, variations in detectors.

Rob, this site's owner, could probably help you to purchase just about any detector or accessory you'd want without fear of getting ripped off.

If you have questions, or someone is telling you whatever about what you ought to purchase or get into, perhaps your best course would be to run it by us before you jump, because a lot of people are out to strip you bare through hype, and almost everybody on this site has already been there and can offer you valuable tips and ideas.

Make this a hobby you can enjoy, and perhaps use to bring your family together through group outings and experience. While not usually a steady income producer hobby, there are treasures out there with your name on them, and the hobby is a good way to blow off the stress of your regular work or job. Something about putting your hands in contact with the soil that helps a guy out.

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