Dign4au2

Can someone recommend a decent 1 man drywasher?

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All sorts of links and plans. The sam redding jobs have a good reputation, though they seem to be more of a sampling type than full production. The fact is however, that after one starts using any type or model, they'll start tweaking it towards the user's own preference and work site.

I sort of like the idea of using an electric motor driven unit, rather than engine powered or hand cranked jobs. it would run quiet, and with a rheostat, could easily be adjust to the run speed. Gas engines are problematic because with dirt and dusty environments, ambient temperatures, and belt drive ratios, will either run too fast at slow idle, or not fast enough when cranked to the max. Gas engines do offer less site clutter, but with any mechanical contraption, take a lot of parts and tools, lubricants, and expendables so that any breakdown or quirk in the field, won't ruin the outing.

as far as dirt and grit goes, perhaps the gas engine is best suited to that environment, because an electric motor will suck the grit in and grind away the inside of the motor. with a motor or engine driven contraption, the user can shovel a few, then stand back out of the dirt and dust. with a hand crank, the user will be as dirty or moreso, that the actual dirt pile, and may require some sort of bath on the part of the operator before being able to enter any store, bar, restaurant, market, or snack counter in a gas station, not to mention tons of lousy dirt all inside of the cab of the vehicle and environs. (probably not so bad if the guy doesn't have a significant other along, or waiting at home to use the dirt cloud.).

When building a drywasher, two things come to mind- One is keeping it as light as possible, and the second is to allow for at least 16" clearance underneath the lowest working part or bellows. as they produce quite a bit of gravel and rocks on one end, and fines on the other that tend to flow underneath the unit, you'll want enough space to clean it up or out while the unit is running, and not hit or whack the parts or bellows that could lead to tears or nicks. I've built some out of clear doug fir for the legs, but built my last one out of steel rectangular tubing. I put wheels on it to roll it around. I can take the engine off of the unit, but while in use, coupled with the unit and engine, the weight is around 75 pounds. On the wood units I built, I used a 2 hp honda with a membrane filter. I liked it, and it was easy to keep clean, only 15 lbs., but that size is hard to get anymore. Since then I used both tecumseh and B&S engines- 3-4hp, but the running speed is always problematic.

For bellows and riffle trays, I have used naugahyde and heavy canvas. Both have their pros and cons, but keep a tube of silcone caulk handy along with patch material. on my last rifflle tray, I used a double thickness of double knit which has worked out just hunky dory.

Tools- beside the absolute necessity of a cooler full of cold beer, gatorade, red bull, water, ice, and some bologna, bring some toilet paper, a few rags, change of underwear, 2 picks heads and one pick handle, a couple of lanterns, matches, batteries, lighterfluid, farm jack, wrenches and pliers, wirecutters, screwdrivers, snot (flat fixer), wd40, carb cleaner, air filters, starting fluid, flashlight, flares, first aid kit, pain killers, scissors, a razor knife, cash in small change, and maybe a gun. add something to eat or snack on, and extra coffee, should the local outfit serve watered down variety, you can beef it up as a favor to yourself and all the other people having breakfast in a low overhead joint.

Under ideal conditions, the drywasher recovery ratio is about 65%. don't stand there and crank up the speed of the blower or bellows- no, slow it down and let it do its thing. maybe shovel the tails in again to increase recovery. When starting the rig up, don't just load up the hopper, but charge the riffle tray full of dirt before you start the engine or motor. use a gravel rake to clear tails from under and around the rig; a square point shovel for the front tails, and a round point for the muck pile. use leather gloves and a dust mask, say 3m 8210, or 3m 8511 two-band particle masks. when you get down to hard pan or bedrock, get a gas vac and go to work, and dump the contents into 5-gallon buckets, which you can then load into the drywasher.

If you every see any gold that you can pick up, do it now, or it may become forever lost (the earth will swallow it up again). This happens to sluicers too- just a strange and negative natural action.

Try to stockpile enough dirt to run the unit for 30-40 minutes. at the end of that cycle, stop the engine/motor, clean out the tray, take a 15-20 minute rest and eat or drink, then create another stockpile and start a new gig. You should be shovelling a few, then resting in the shovel, maybe a swig or two, then load the feed bin again. enjoy the ambiance, don't kill yourself over it or over dreams of losing millions by taking your time about it. It's a hobby, not a day job.

Down below are a few links, not only about plans, but about places and experiences. The thompson drywasher looks like a solid contraption, only I don't care that the crank is hanging low.

for ease of use, the blower types are easier to get around than most of the bellows types. just be sure to get some flexible sewer pipe (RV stores) long enough to keep the blower engine far out of the way of the dirt and dust storm.

On any of these, best to work them on windy days, say 10 mph to 25 mph. the dust masks can be purchased at a paint store. any brand will do, just be sure to get one rated N95 or higher for best protection.

I would also suggest that you go to a construction tool outlet and purchase an electric generator and a 40-80 pound electric demolition hammer, with both bull point and 2" spade points. These will save a lot of time in hardpan, and when digging below thin caliche layers, are invaluable over swinging a pick. besides, it's less dangerous than swinging a pick and hitting a big rock, chipping off rock fragment that fly like bullets into one's head, face, body...

http://www.vintageprojects.com/misc/dry-wa...l

http://miningold.com/dry.html

http://home.att.net/~desert-gold-diggers/equip/equip.htm

http://www.arizonagoldprospectors.com/research.htm

http://nevada-outback-gems.com/design_plans/DIY_drywash/dry_wash.htm

http://searchwarp.com/swa240744.htm

http://www.treasurequestxlt.com/community/prospecting-gold/9585-drywasher-plans-product-review-info.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2531490/Dry-Washer

http://prospecting-gold.com/goldprospectingequipmentplans

http://www.havasugold.com/

http://www.gpex.ca/homemade-gold-prospecting-tools.html

http://www.thompsondrywasher.com/models.htm

http://goldbedrockgold.blogspot.com/2008/10/more-free-gold-mining-equipment-plans.html

http://www.lifestylestore.com/ls_books_plans.htm

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2404121/197109-Desert-Magazine-1971-September?page=40

http://www.silysavg.com/goodplanscheap/gpcmain.html

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You know, FrankC's mini sampler, is pretty hard to beat for a one man opperation and at $150, I think it is a bargain! It is a pull cord bellows type that is very lite and gets the gold!

Bunk

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my favorite is the thompson leaf blower type and is verry affordable with outstanding recovery

ive had them all and this is the only one i diddnt need to modify

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Hey Guys,

   Does anyone know if Rattlesnake Jim on this thread is still around or alive today?  Would love any information if possible? 

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On 6/22/2019 at 12:35 PM, nuggethunting said:

Hey Guys,

   Does anyone know if Rattlesnake Jim on this thread is still around or alive today?  Would love any information if possible? 

 

18 hours ago, GPX Power said:

hes back over at the NS forum B) Mike C...:ph34r:

Yes Rob Jim recently has shown back up over on Bill's forum, his profile shows he has visited the forum today so if you send him a PM over there he should see it.

Here's a link to one of his recent posts and also a link to his profile page.

https://nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/profile/2219-snakejim/?wr=eyJhcHAiOiJmb3J1bXMiLCJtb2R1bGUiOiJmb3J1bXMtY29tbWVudCIsImlkXzEiOjMzOTk3LCJpZF8yIjozMTMwOTB9

 

https://nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/topic/33997-hello-from-roswell-new-mexico/

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Hey Guys,

   Thanks. I'm not sure if he patrols here anymore or not.  I had a customer that was referred to talk with him about an old drywasher.  If anyone can contact him, let me know.  Thanks!

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For prospecting and sampling I use my patented 18" Sweep Jig. Very quiet, and recovers even flour gold, wet or dry. And, no dust when used dry.

sweep jig at Bonanza Bar

Dry operation, in search of pyrite crystal here:

SJ at the Peg Leg

Jim

 

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