Can You Answer The Impossible Question?


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Can You Answer The Impossible Question?

At what point is a gold flake big enough to be called a nugget? :blink:

Ive decided to make this post fun. Lets make it a contest. Just for fun I'm going to donate a genuine approximately 1.2 gram gold nugget to the winner! The nugget is one of my finds from Rich Hill Arizona.

Unfortunately we have to have some rules to keep it fair.

Here we go: I'm going to let this post run for one week.

All members are free to post as many answers to this impossible question as they want until Friday night march 9 at 12:00 midnight. All day Saturday all members can vote on this post who they think gave the best answer to this question. The winner will be announced Sunday march 11 The member with the most votes wins!

You can only vote for your favorite (post) answer once.

New members that participate in the vote will be subject to email verification.

Absentee votes beforehand for members that cant vote Saturday march 10 will be included in the vote.

I'm trying to keep this as fair as possible, There are no strings attachted. The winner will be announced Sunday march 11 The winner must PM me with mailing instructions. The nugget will be shipped with delivery confirmation free.

If you have any questions PM me or post them and I will answer A.S.A.P. Good Luck and

Have Fun :) AzNuggetBob

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I think most people that detect would say if it makes an audible noise when dropped in a pan it is said to be nuggety. If however you are designing gold recovery systems, then other things are considered. Gold studied under magnification has many shapes, forms, etc, some forms, shapes, are relatively easy to recover and some are not and therein lies the challenge for me, gold that is minute and hard to recover can easily pay for many things if time is taken to setup your system to make it drop out instead of floating away...HH... Geo

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Hello Bob,

That is always a good question. Anything I can pick up with a Minelab PI detector is a nugget to me. That is normally a few grains (480 grain to a Troy Ounce) and bigger.

In the picture below I have some "Dink" Nuggets and some larger ones.

The Minelab PI's will find small gold nuggets like the ones pictured below. I honestly don't want to find anything smaller than the nuggets pictured above the Quarter. I can drywash, dredge and pan for small pieces.

All these nuggets were found with the Minelab GPX-4000 and Coiltek 14-inch Round Mono Searchcoil. Pretty much the best combination (detector/searchcoil) that I have found for where I like to hunt.

Take care,

Rob Allison

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I'm with grubstake and Steve H.

Flakes are that, and while many are big enough to handle with your fingers, they aren't of a thickness that would fall into a category of a nugget.

Leaf gold and flakes can be called specimen gold,

but little pieces of gold more than a 16th inch thick, more commonly called a chip if the size is more of a matchhead shape- a 16th to and 8th of an inch, and globular shaped, like a grain of rice.

when it gets to a pea gravel size or corn size, it is definitely a nugget.

to some extent, when a person could solder a post to it, such as in pierced earrings or tie tacks, such would qualify as a natural nugget, albeit, a small one, and are commonly sold as such.

on a selling standpoint, flakes bring in about 25% less than spot price, if the flakes and grains are yellow enough. If they are brassy looking, they would sell for less than than unless some sort of test was made to prove that the silvery color came from platinum.

It's best to sell off the small flakes and grains for whatever you could get, and keep the matchheads and nuggets for investment, as, depending on their character, size, shape, roughness, these nuggets appreciate in value to be worth 2X - 3X the weight value on a threshold level, and some, much more than that.

Also on the high range of relative worth, are the larger leaf and large flake gold sold on the specimen market, including gold that was in solid rock dissolved away with hydroflouric acid to expose the leafiness of the natural gold veinlets; some of which will flutter with air currents, and not break off.

Maybe a confusing essay, but take your pick and go with it.

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Hello everyone, there are no rules on what you post.Your answer can be funny , creative, or just catchy . It dosent matter. It just must get the most votes by the members to win! And of course you cant win if you dont have a post. You can post as many times as you want. Someone is going to win the 1.2+ gram Gold nugget, there is already votes! ;) Good Luck AzNuggetBob

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Hi Bob,

I will go right along with Grubstake on this one. After all, the oldtimers seem to know best. This is a good question and the answers are, as we know, basically opinions. When it comes to opinions, they are like eyebrows, most people have at least one.

Besides, I would hate to be the one to try to tell a guy who found his first small piece of gold with a detector that it isn't a nugget.

Reg

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Hey Reg,Im not voting but I like Iggy's vote (literally) And grubstake's answer is universal language. When I get home from nugget hunting, My wife always asks well honey how did you do today? and without a word I reach into my pocket pull out my plastic nugget bottle and give it a shake. Its either clink clink, clunk clunk or not a sound. And that says it all. :lol:

Aznuggetbob

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Hi Dutchman,

There you go adding to the confusion. Then again, maybe not. The definition via Webster for a nugget is a "lump" of precious metal. Now, "lump" is defined as a piece or mass of indefinite size and shape. So, if we add the two definitions we get a nugget being defined as a piece or mass of indefinite size and shape of precious metal.

Makes sense to me.

Thanks for the clarification.

Reg

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Hi,

In the interest of keeping the thread alive I'll modify my earlier post. For it to be a nugget I need to be able to easily pick it up with two fingers and roll it around. Flakes need not apply.

Let's get more specific. I'd say about 4 grains and roundish to be a nugget at minimum. I'd guess that is about what the small nuggets Rob pictured weigh.

Steve Herschbach

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A peice of gold is a nugget when.........

1. You show it to somebody who is not involved in our hobby and they say wow! or "hey thats beautiful"

2. They ask to hold it and your heart doesn't skip a beat because you will need your detector to find it if

they drop it.

3. They drop it and your heart skips a beat because you wonder if your trophy's now got some ghastly mark

on it's untouched surface that you never marked as you dug it out of the ground wildy swinging a pick

and raking it out of the hole with gravel and dirt.

4. You come back from a weekend prospecting dirty, battle scarred and hungry. Your lovely wife asks to

see what you found and she doesn't have to hold back fits of laughter.

5. You show another prospector your find and you both don't have to make up excuses like "well as least we

don't have to gut it or scale it".

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Can You Answer The Impossible Question?

At what point is a gold flake big enough to be called a nugget? :blink:

Ive decided to make this post fun. Lets make it a contest. Just for fun I'm going to donate a genuine approximately 1.2 gram gold nugget to the winner! The nugget is one of my finds from Rich Hill Arizona.

Unfortunately we have to have some rules to keep it fair.

Here we go: I'm going to let this post run for one week.

All members are free to post as many answers to this impossible question as they want until Friday night march 9 at 12:00 midnight. All day Saturday all members can vote on this post who they think gave the best answer to this question. The winner will be announced Sunday march 11 The member with the most votes wins!

You can only vote for your favorite (post) answer once.

New members that participate in the vote will be subject to email verification.

Absentee votes beforehand for members that cant vote Saturday march 10 will be included in the vote.

I'm trying to keep this as fair as possible, There are no strings attachted. The winner will be announced Sunday march 11 The winner must PM me with mailing instructions. The nugget will be shipped with delivery confirmation free.

If you have any questions PM me or post them and I will answer A.S.A.P. Good Luck and

Have Fun :) AzNuggetBob

Here's my take on the subject:

Anything that CAN'T be weighed is refered to as "a little piece of gold"

Anything that can be weighed up to 3 grains is a "dink" or "dinker"

Anything that weighs between 3 grains and 12 ounces is a "nugget"

Anything over 12 ounces has a name for the nugget like- the "Big Whopper" nugget or The "Lucky Strike" nugget or it's named after a person or place.

Steve :)

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Hi all, Just wanted to remind everybody that today (Friday March 9 until midnight) is the last day to post your answers to the impossible question. So far I think the post has been going very well. There has already been some great answers. From funny to logical and even technical. Who will win ? I would not even venture a guess right now. And also don't forget to vote tomorrow for your favorite answer. Your votes will decide who the Gold Nugget winner is.

You still have time to enter your answer!

I received another PM from someone trying to figure out who I was so I'll take the mystery out of it right here.

Bob Gutowski B) AKA AzNuggetBob B)

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