Goldbug and goldbug 2?


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I was looking at the goldbug and goldbug 2s.

I have some question is the goldbug just as good at finding small gold as the gold bug 2.

1.what are the major differences? Other than price.

2. Do you have a gold bug and do you like it.

3.Are there better options for around this price range.

4. Can you piece together a metal detector like you can a gun with parts kits?

Also my Great uncle used to panning and prospect all the time for hours on end he had a metal detector that he gave to one of my family members and i might be able to get it cheap what do i need to look for so i will know if it is capable of picking up gold.

Thanks, for all the help

Johnathan

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I was looking at the goldbug and goldbug 2s.

I have some question is the goldbug just as good at finding small gold as the gold bug 2.

1.what are the major differences? Other than price.

2. Do you have a gold bug and do you like it.

3.Are there better options for around this price range.

4. Can you piece together a metal detector like you can a gun with parts kits?

Also my Great uncle used to panning and prospect all the time for hours on end he had a metal detector that he gave to one of my family members and i might be able to get it cheap what do i need to look for so i will know if it is capable of picking up gold.

Thanks, for all the help

Johnathan

Jonathan,

I have 2 GB2's, and for me, they are the best when it comes to finding small gold. Personally, I would not have any other VLF detector. The GB2 versus the other VLF detectors is like a Ford vs Chevy or Dodge. It's simply a matter of preference, and I honestly don't know what the differences are between the original GB and the GB2. My understanding is they are both great when it comes to finding small gold with the small coil. They cost more than the average VLF detectors, but they produce. But that's only my two cents on the subject. Most of the gold I have found - Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Arizona, has been at or near the surface. I will say that when I was down to Stanton AZ, the highly mineralized ground gave me fits as I would have to ground balance just about every other swing. I might have been doing something wrong, but I'm not sure. I would contact Rob Allison who is the administrator for this forum and ask him the basic differences. He sells all brands of detectors, and has a ton of experience.

h20prospector

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Hi,

The Gold Bug was the original model. It ran at 19 kHz and was strictly an all-metal unit. It has not been made for quite some time. It would hit gold as small as a few grains, quite a feat in its day.

The Gold Bug 2 runs at a much higher 71 kHz, and has an optional iron discrimination circuit. It is much hotter than the original Gold Bug, hitting on gold weighing as little as 1/10th grain. This comes at a price, as the extreme high frequency does not penetrate the ground as well as the lower 19 kHz range. The original Gold Bug has much better depth on large nuggets in mineralized ground. But the lack of iron discrimination was the main drawback and the unit was finally dropped.

Obviously the only way you can get a Gold Bug these days is to buy used. They were $499 new so around $200 used would be a good price. The Gold Bug 2 is still in production and can generally be had for around $700.00. A possible alternative new would be the Tesoro Lobo ST by the same engineer. It is a 17 kHz unit with automatic ground tracking and a full range discrimination mode. You could look at it as being an updated Gold Bug. They go for $639.00.

There are lots of other alternatives out there but I'm trying to limit this to the original questions. As far as building your own nugget detector the answer for 99% of us is no.

Steve Herschbach

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Hi,

The Gold Bug was the original model. It ran at 19 kHz and was strictly an all-metal unit. It has not been made for quite some time. It would hit gold as small as a few grains, quite a feat in its day.

The Gold Bug 2 runs at a much higher 71 kHz, and has an optional iron discrimination circuit. It is much hotter than the original Gold Bug, hitting on gold weighing as little as 1/10th grain. This comes at a price, as the extreme high frequency does not penetrate the ground as well as the lower 19 kHz range. The original Gold Bug has much better depth on large nuggets in mineralized ground. But the lack of iron discrimination was the main drawback and the unit was finally dropped.

Obviously the only way you can get a Gold Bug these days is to buy used. They were $499 new so around $200 used would be a good price. The Gold Bug 2 is still in production and can generally be had for around $700.00. A possible alternative new would be the Tesoro Lobo ST by the same engineer. It is a 17 kHz unit with automatic ground tracking and a full range discrimination mode. You could look at it as being an updated Gold Bug. They go for $639.00.

There are lots of other alternatives out there but I'm trying to limit this to the original questions. As far as building your own nugget detector the answer for 99% of us is no.

Steve Herschbach

Well here is another question do you think that i could make the $300 back if i got the gold bug 2 in gold findings? I live in Morganton, NC 28655 and there is supposed to be alot of gold around here. And also i have heard from my great grandma that there is a whole jar full of gold buried on the creek bank of one of the creeks on our property back from some war. I am a beginner at prospecting i have not even found a fleck of gold yet but i am thinking that the metal detector will put me on some gold. Better and may make my budget a little bigger. Do you think the gold bug 1 will work for now seeing how my budget is tight right now.

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Hi,

Not trying to be a bummer here, but if you've never prospected or detected before then do not spend money with the thought of making it back. It took me years of spending money prospecting enough to finally get to where I could actually make a buck doing it. There is a lot to learn, and simply buying a detector is probably the easiest part.

I'm not trying to discourage you but simply pointing out some reality. I hope you give it a go but frankly I'd tend to advise you get a gold pan and take up panning. You go pan enough gold to pay for the gold pan (not that easy for a beginner) and you'll have what it takes to be a prospector. It is all about research and getting access to gold bearing locations. If you can't get yourself into a place where you can pay for a $9 gold pan then you'll probably never be able to pay off of a detector either.

I've been involved in a lot of larger scale mining projects. I learned long ago to never invest a dollar into prospecting or mining unless you are prepared to lose it.

Steve Herschbach

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regardless of which GB you buy, the coils on one cannot be used on the other. The limits of the GB series is they aren't great in trashy areas (hobnails, bullets, buck shot, iron trash).

I would recommend that you get the GB2 and both the marshmallow coil, as well as the 14" elliptical. Matter of fact, the 14" works really good as an all-purpose size. however on the rigs, there are no depth meters, visuals, or gauges. Obviously, there is a lot of difference between detecting small gold flakes, say 3/8" across, than a jar full of gold nuggets. As far as I know, the gold in NC and environs isn't all that big anyway.

You may want to look at a good combo detector- one for both relics and sizeable gold, that can be used around battlefields, the beach, searches for lost jewelry, coins, and old homesteads or townsites. The really good ones tend to cost a bit more than the GB2, but for your area, would probably fit the bill a bit better.

Out in AZ and the West, the ground has maximum concentrations of metallic sands that would kill most detectors. That is, you would have to tune one to ignore one kind of metal in the ground, while also being able to tune it to recognize other bits of metal in the same area, and at depth.

Besides a detector, you'll have to buy specialty headphones, digging gear, amplifiers (sometimes), and other accessories to get the most out of your rig; sort of like customizing your car. Out of the box or off the showroom floor these things will work good enough, but if you get into tough areas, you have to add things depending on your overall situation, or in the case of your ride, snow tires, trailer hitch, GPS, and other goods.

I would also recommend that you hook up with a club that can offer you shortcut education under actual field conditions. Google prospecting clubs. there's sure to be a few near you in both mining and relic areas to help you out.

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Steve hit it spot on. I detect because I love to do it not because I'm trying to make a dollar. Don't get me wrong its nice when make some cash and start to profit. I bet you can ask almost everyone on any of these forums and they will tell you its not about the gold but the hunt to find it. I sell my gold but only to pay my wife off so she will let me go when ever I ask her. Buy what you can afford and remember its a hobby not a job. Good luck out there and if you do buy one I would lean towards the GB2

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Thanks for all the information. I know that im not going to strike it rich the first day or year for that matter my great uncle panned for years on end and only found a handful of gold. But my budget is tight so the gold bug will have to do for now i found one for $200. I will try to join a club near here in Marion.

Some more questions.

I went hiking in the linville gorge a couple of months ago and i could not help but to notice hundreds of quartz reins. How common do the contain gold. Like number wise 1 in a 1000 or more like 1 in 100000.

And my great uncle which has past away gave one of my family members a metal detector. And i could possibly get it for free or around $20. What do i need to look for in a nugget detector. He only bought the good stuff but its probably pretty old.

Again thanks to everyone that has help out. Im sure you will see many more questions from me in the near future.

Thanks,

Johnathan

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quartz is as common as dirt, and a lot of quartz is metal free.

Geology is a big subject. go to a prospecting shop or amazon, if not a library, and pick up some books on prospecting, placer mining, placer gold. many sell for about $10 or so. On another thread, East and South mining areas, are some links that may be right up your alley. There can be a lot of negativity when it comes to first finds, but maybe your cards are sorted different than mine of those of others. I had a friend, using a sketch map I drew up, find a really big nugget the first time out, and he never knew what real natural gold even looked like. He found a honker at a spot that so many others had overlooked, or drove over, as in the shoulder of the highway.

Pick up everything the detector sounds off on. Take it home and study it. once you figure out value from garbage, pitch out the garbage then go looking again. There are good booklets out there by Jim Straight, James Klein, and others. Almost all states have some sort of Dept of Minerals, with brochures and booklets on areas that were mined in the past, and tips on specific areas with good potential.

If there are 'bucket' mines in your area, go there and pay admission, then start working on your hole. Once you develop an eye for where the gold is, relative to the country rocks and coloration, use that info to start prospecting on your own. Don't be afraid to try virgin or isolated areas, or even areas adjacent to the bucket mines areas.

HERE, I found the list of links:

GEORGIA GOLD MINES

http://www.weekendgoldminers.com/gold_links/gold_links.htm

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1...gia.html?cat=46

http://www.nuggethunters.org/

NORTH CAROLINA GOLD LINKS

http://www.thermalcitygoldmine.com/

http://www.luckystrikegoldandgem.com/

http://www.usatoday.com/money/markets/2009...d-economy_N.htm

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2...lina.html?cat=7

http://www.cottonpatchgoldmine.com/

GRANDADDY LOCATIONS:

http://books.google.com/books?id=XrRNAAAAM...ing&f=false

EASTERN USA GOLD AREAS

http://www.infiltec.com/gold/

http://doccopper.tripod.com/gold/easternAu.html

http://www.thenorthwestern.com/article/200.../OSH03/90817176

GENERAL INFORMATION

http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/prospect2/prospectgip.html

VIRGINIA GOLD

http://books.google.com/books?id=6IsAAAAAM...ing&f=false

CONTACT INFORMATION- ALL STATES

http://books.google.com/books?id=wFJGvE1_2...ing&f=false

PAGE 33

Besides gold, look into meteorites and tektites- some of those can be far more valuable than gold. Your journey, which may seem like failure while learning your way around, is actually a great pastime to get out and enjoy nature, and what's at your feet. It alleviates stress and tension at home or work. allows you to think about God and the wonders of the planet. Inspires you to dream and think about different roads and paths in life. Allows you to appreciate history and the quest to re-locate something that someone before valued highly. The exercise will help your own state of health, and may prevent a heart attack or something like that, or at least, give you an option to recover from one, or from surgery. Maybe you'll find a friend or two, or be able to establish stronger bonds with your own kids and wife through your hobby. There is so much more to the quest for gold than simply finding it. Other things along the way can make you truly rich and happy, at least for the duration of the hunt.

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There are a lot of detectors out there and not all are suited for nugget hunting. On the other hand, any detector will find a nugget if it's big enough and laying there on the surface. $20 sounds like a great deal but perhaps you should first find out what make and model the detector is and I'm sure someone here could could tell you if it's suited for prospecting...

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