Hi All! Newbie here!


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First, let me say "Thanks!" to the generous folks that own and operate this fantastic site! It's pretty amazing to say the least that such a valuable place like this exists; it's great that a neophyte such as I can have such a resource at me finger tips! Again, thanks!

Okay, here we go, here's my situation ... I live in good old Reno, Nevada and recently bought a big dualsport bike that'll have no trouble taking me to places out into our great surrounding desert. And so as I'm sure you've guessed, I want to go out and look for gold and I'd like to do it with a metal detector, a brand and model that, say, is somewhere in the $700 neighborhood (as I really can't afford more than that at this time).

About 15 or so years ago I bought a White for around that price and was very disappointed when I went out with it and discovered that it made a sound like a mosquito buzzing ALL the time, as if to indicate that I was up to my neck in gold when, as far as I could tell, there were only a lot of rocks and dirt around!

Fortunately, I ended up selling it for a good price a short time later and thus didn't get too hurt.

So my question is, do they now-a days make a detector that is either dedicated to gold or has a switch to make it tuned into searching for gold - without the crazy mesquito buzzing noise - and which will ONLY sound off when there really in fact is gold beneath its coil? (Or am I a century too early to be asking if such technology exists?)

During that short time when I ventured into looking for gold, there was a machine on the market called the Fisher Gold Bug which kinda specialized in gold nugget hunting (think I'll Google it, now that I think of it:-), but wonder if the technology has jumped leap years to the criteria I've described here for my wishes? Hmm.

Also, if there is such a (WONDERFUL) machine on the market, would you say that the Black Rocket Desert would be the best place to go in order to see about hauling up some (basket ball size;-) nuggets from the earth? (It's about a 100 miles from where I live, and I've heard it said that it's a place where nuggets do spot the area, though I'm not sure if the guy that told me is credible.)

Well, that's all for now; thanks in advance for your replies, if any!!!!!!!

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Hi,

Nearly all good gold machines when run properly have you listening to a threshold sound. Any pro here will tell you it is the secret of good detecting. The human ear can pick out a slight variation in sound better than it can pick a faint sound out of silence. Your ear is tuned to the threshold.

You can get rid of the sound by simply turning down the threshold control. And leave nuggets for people like me to find. If you frequent areas with lots of detecting activitiy it will spell the secret between success and failure. But if you are lucky enough to get over nuggets of size at less than max depths you will find them regardless.

I have found lots of gold with the Fisher Gold Bug 2 in iron disc mode, which is a silent search mode. If you are determined to go silent, check into it. Got me over 3 ounces last summer just messing around so it will find gold set up that way.

But your best bet is to find a machine with a tone you do not mind listening to. The Minelab Eureka Gold has an adjustable tone control. And remember the tone should be so low as to be barely discernable. Maybe you simply run it too loud, which is not only annoying but couterproductive as a too loud threshold can be as bad as none at all.

Hope this helps!

Steve Herschbach

http://www.moorecreek.com

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Thank you Sir for your comments; they are welcome because they do help me to sort things out before I lay any big bucks down.

I guess they haven't yet developed a machine yet that'll only sound off when there's really gold underneath it. Too, bad; I was sooo hoping they would have by now because it would make it so much easier. But from what I gather from what you said, it's possible to set it so it makes very little noise until there's a decent size nugget, thus leaving the tiny stuff. Maybe with my strategy that would be the way to go -- just cover LOTS of ground for the big and exciting stuff, and let others clean up on the more inconsequential stuff!!

I'll admit that I had no idea what I was doing with that White I owned, with all its knobs and switches, but if I do it this time I'll either go for something they sell here or look on ebay for something. I do know that I've seen some sweet pics of nuggets that were said to have been found with Gold Bugs that they were selling from the days when I gave it a little shot, and thus one of those machines are tempting, especially since you said you had some luck with yours.:-)

Per chance do you know if the Black Rock Desert would be a great place to see what a detector can come up with?

Again, thanks for your time!

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Dear TheSearcher;

I am sort of new to the nugget hunting game myself, but I can share a few thoughts with you on what I've found to be the most effective ways to find nuggets with a metal detector. First, a properly set threshold should be barely audible and not irritating to listen to. A nugget doesn't squawk like a coin, instead it usually sounds more like a *sigh* , that is, the threshold just barely rises and falls. Setting the threshold properly is ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL to finding nuggets! This cannot be stressed often enough, my friend. A threshold which is set too high will cause those little sighs to get lost in the background noise and conversely, a threshold that is set too low will not allow the sigh to break through the audible barrier. Both situations result in one thing. LOST GOLD! Properly setting the threshold takes practice and experience, but in time you will train yourself how to do it. Next, selecting a detector. There is not a detector in the world which will sound off only on gold, and the first person to invent such a detector will become an overnight millionaire. For example, lead and gold share almost identical physical properties, and as such, they sound almost alike in the ground. It is very very difficult for a detector to distinguish between a lead bullet and a gold nugget, and likewise, I don't know of a detectorist who is able to tell the two apart from their respective audible tones. Iron is something else that responds beautifully to a detector because it oxides rapidly in the soil and it leaves a beautiful halo, just waiting for a search coil to pass over it. I have a White's GMT that I purchased from Rob Allison, the moderator of this forum, and it does an outstanding job of discriminating iron. In fact, that is all I use the detector for. If I am prospecting in trashy ground, I will go in with the GMT first and pick out all of the trash, then go back in with my Minelab and get the nuggets! Next, detector selection. For a new nugget detectorist, I would shy away from the VLF detectors and go straight to a Pulse Induction (or PI for short) detector. Minelab is the undisputed king in the PI arena. The shortcomings of a VLF detector will become appalling apparent in a matter of just a few days.If I'm digging up nuggets in the 14" to 18" range with my Minelab GP3000, I am probably able to punch down to 4" to 6" in depth with my White's GMT. The PI detector has a HUGE advantage in this regard. You see, my friend, gold LOVES mineralized soil and this is where all VLF detectors fall short. They just can't punch through the mineralization down to where the nuggies are hiding at. Gold is almost the heaviest mineral in nature, and as such, it responds to gravity very well.In other words, gold immediately hauls azz straight down into the soil until it is stopped by something, such as bedrock. There it will rest until an outside force moves it and it finds a crack or break and then it continues it's downward journey. If you are hunting in exposed bedrock, or in VERY shallow soil, say a few inches deep, then a VLF will whup some behind like nobodys' business, but get into some moderately deep soil and it will come up short every time. I like my GMT when I am hunting in the seasonaly dry watercourses where the riverbeds are exposed during the dry season and the overburden is very shallow to non-existent. But once I move in soil that is greater than about 6" in depth or soil that's mineralized, I have my GP3000 in my hands. For a first detector I would seriously consider the Minelab SD2100 to be the prime candidate for you. They cost about $1695.00, which at first seems like a huge investment, but after you realize the benefits of a PI detector over a VLF then you will be glad that you sunk the extra cash into a PI first. Trust me on this one. I did things opposite than most people, that is, I purchased a Minelab GP3000 from Rob Allison as my first detector, then just recently I ordered an SD2100, also from Rob. In fact, the SD2100 should be clearing Customs here in Bolivia by the middle of this week and I can start using it. The Minelab GP series detectors are formidable machines and as such, they are sort of complicated to use, especially for new detectorists. The SD2100 is really a bare bones, no frills detector without all of the bells and whistles of a GP series detector. One of the beautiful aspects of an SD2100 as a first purchase is the fact that the initical investment is small in comparison to buying a Minelab GP3500 at $3500.00. What makes the SD2100 so attractive is that the detectorist can easily sell the SD2100 for close to the purchase price and apply that money to a GP3500. The truth is the SD2100 detectors hold their value very well. Also, ALL of the various accessories which you can purchase for the SD2100 can also be used for ALL Minelab GP detectors too! That includes the lightweight battery packs from Coiltek, coils, sound enhancers, etc. Virtually every accessory that you buy for your SD2100 can be retained and utilized on an GP3500. This means that you don't need to buy everything twice, which I find to be very attractive. I hope that all of this information assists you in the purchase of your first detector. As always, should you have any questions about buying a detector, drop a PM to Rob Allison on this board and he will be happy to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the myriad of detectors on the market today. He is the most knowledgeable and fairest detector dealer that I know of and I highly recommend that you discuss matters with him before you make any purchasing decisions.

Your friend;

LAMAR

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LAMAR --

Wow! I'm humbled that anyone would take as much trouble as you took to share all of that valuable info with me, Thanks!

I am definately interest in the MineLab SD2100 because of all the reasons you stated. But my finances are such that at this time there's just no way that I could afford such a machine. I'm thinking that maybe if I go with a Gold Bug and THEN find a nugget or two, then I could have enough dough to slap down to get the better machine at $1695.

I do sincerely thank you for being such a great guy by giving me so much to think about; pretty amazing! :-)

Also, it's cool how you said that you often go through with your White to remove the junk before you go through with the IP Minelab machine to get the gold. That's pretty cool thinking!

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Dear TheSearcher;

You are very welcome my friend! It's my pleasure to offer you advice as I had a great many folks on this very same board offering me advice, tips, tricks, etc when I first started looking for gold with a metal detector. Every piece of advice that I recieved has helped me to find gold! What you might ought to do is to check around your local area and find someone who is a SUCCESSFUL nugget shooter and pick their brains for information. There is a good ol' boy who goes by the handle of RenoChris who stops by here on occasion and I'm hoping that he will chime in and offer up some advice to you. He is gold smart, IMHO. Also, you may want to check in with another super-nice fellow named Doc Lousignont. He is a Minelab dealer in Nevada and also a Coiltek dealer and he won't steer you down the wrong path either. Here is a link to Doc's home page:

http://www.docsdetecting.com/

You should try and spend as much time as you can researching your area, the various detectors on the market, the past gold discoveries in your area, the amount and types of mineralization you are likely to encounter, etc. The mineralization aspect pretaining to your area should be of initical importance because it should be a very large determining factor on your choice of detector.I can't hammer this point home hard enough my friend. I spent over 1 year researching mineral deposits in Bolivia BEFORE I bought my GP3000! Then, it was over 1 year BEFORE I found my first gold nugget! Does this sound discouraging to you? It shouldn't. I just returned home from a prospecting trip in Oruro, Bolivia today and I recovered 4.72 ounces of the yellow stuff in 3 days. Yep, 3 D-A-Y-S! I am NOT bragging my friend, merely trying to prove my claim that research, research, research pays off BIG dividends in the long haul.

Your friend;

LAMAR

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Hi TheSearcher: You may be able to find a slightly used Gold Bug 2 for $350 to $550 on one of the forums. They have three coils available, 6 1/2 " , 10", and 14" eliptical. Larger the coil the deeper the penetration, however I doubt that the bug will punch much deeper that 10 inches. some members of prospecting groups and clubs have units for sale from time to time. it is inexpensive to join these clubs for the most part and it also gives you claims to prospect on and buddys to be with....worth looking into.....Lamars suggestion on the SD2100 is a solid one and if you are serious about wanting those larger nuggets you will some day graduate to a Minelab or other PI Machine. Good luck to you...

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In my mind, nugget detecting is the toughest form of individual prospecting to consistently succeed at, so new electronic prospectors can really use as much additional information and training as they can get. It is certainly very possible for the average guy to be successful at nugget shooting, but it is not easy – you have to be willing to make the effort. Consider it like a trade – it is a skill that takes time to learn – you don’t buy a wrench or a voltmeter and become a journeyman plumber or an electrician overnight. I believe it is much more difficult for novice prospector to consistently get nuggets with a metal detector than it is to consistently get a little “color†with a dry washer, sluice box or dredge. With a metal detector, it’s easy to spend a whole day looking very hard and still get skunked. It is normal that it often takes a new detector owner many months to even more than a year to find his or her first nugget – even if you are out detecting for nuggets regularly. The attraction of the metal detector is the fact that the yields can be very much higher - when you are successful, you can find a significant amount of gold very quickly. It takes time, however to learn those skills and gain the experience needed to be successful.

I do think a lot of new guys sometimes look at the forums, see other guys posting photos of gold and get the wrong idea. Too many new guys expect that somehow you can just walk out anyplace near an historical old gold district and start digging bean-sized nuggets every hour or so with the occasional walnut sized nugget thrown in for good measure. Some even figure they can make a good living or even get rich doing it. Unfortunately it's just not that easy, and the prospect for getting rich quick is extremely remote. If you are willing to spend the money to get quality equipment, to put in the time it takes to learn to operate that equipment and then do the work to research potential areas and put in the time to explore around in places where detectable nuggets are found, then you'll be able to find some gold too, but its never easy. Buying a great detector is a fine start, but owning a powerful detector no more makes one an experienced nugget shooter than owning a pipe wrench makes one a plumbing contractor. With both, there are lots of skills to learn, and it takes time to gain the needed knowledge and experience. Dogged determination is a necessary asset for the new electronic prospector!

The nugget photos posted on the forums and shown in magazines demonstrate that there is still plenty of gold out there, which is true. But it is important to know that finding gold takes knowledge, skill, hard work, and sometimes a little luck. Too many new guys jump in thinking its not that hard – they soon get hit with the reality that it is not at all easy. If you are wanting to buy that expensive detector, commit in your mind to do what it takes and know success won’t happen overnight. Research is an important key to gaining knowledge – it allows the prospector to learn of new places to explore and what to look for when he reaches the target area. Actually hitting the field and swinging your coil with what you found out in your research and listening to the suggestions of more experienced hands will allow you to find your own patches of nuggets. If you are willing to study and learn, then work hard to find your own gold, in time, you can and will succeed.

Getting the best quality equipment isn’t cheap. The cost of a top of the line, brand new Minelab GP3500 with the typical accessories and a few extra coils currently runs well over $4000, and that is no small chunk of change. Yet in spite of that fact, there seems to be an unending stream of new prospectors – often retirees – that are willing to shell out some significant money to get involved in this exciting pastime. A surprising number are completely new prospectors. These are guys who have never panned, sluiced or dry washed a single flake previously, but are attracted to the possibility that sophisticated detector technology can help them find some trophy sized gold nuggets (I can say from experience that staring too long at those trophy nuggets will give you a bad case of gold fever faster than you can imagine!).

What detector should I buy?

That’s probably the most common first question asked on the electronic prospecting forums by new guys, and there are a lot of opinions out there. Many guys see how expensive the top of the line stuff really is and want to cut corners and buy a less expensive detector. You can sometimes get decent bargains in used equipment, but in the end you do get what you pay for. Both VLF and PI type technologies have their place, but it is no coincidence that the guys doing the best in AZ and NV (and many other locations) are doing so with minelab pulse detectors in the GP and SD series. In certain parts of the mother lode country of California and also Alaska, there are places where the advantages of minelabs are not as large because the mineralization is mild, but unless you know that those are the only places you will be hunting, you'd be better off in the long run with that more expensive minelab. Even in CA and AK, minelabs have a big advantage in many parts of those states.

In general, detectors designed for use as coin and jewelry shooting machines make very poor gold detectors, they are just not sensitive enough to detect small nuggets. Some multi purpose VLFs can also be used for coin hunting and other detecting. VLFs which are specifically designed to detect gold nuggets have an advantage over PI detectors with tiny gold, and have better discrimination. They are generally less expensive than PI detectors, which is often a reason many are attracted to them. Unfortunately, they also have serious problems with hot rocks and mineralized soils which are all too common in many gold districts. In the many gold districts where mineralized soils are common it is necessary to turn down the sensitivity in order to use them, which is a serious disadvantage and greatly limits how deeply they can detect. VLFs work best in old mine dumps, and areas with shallow surface exposures of bedrock. However in desert areas and other locations where PIs have an advantage, that advantage can be VERY significant.

Gold is heavy and it tends to work its way down deep, and here the PI detectors like the Minelabs have an advantage in seeing gold deeper, especially in heavily mineralized soils. Because they can ignore considerable soil mineralization, large coils can be used where deep detection is an advantage. The disadvantage to most is the high cost of purchasing a complete PI outfit, including accessories and a few aftermarket coils. The other disadvantage is in prospecting areas with large amounts of very deep trash, where your PI may have you digging crater sized holes for deeply buried trash – this is the downside of deep detecting. Gold is hard to find and you should not intentionally handicap yourself getting a detector that will be at a disadvantage in competing with other prospectors who have PI detectors. The deeper your detector can see, the more places will be open to you in detecting. Many prospectors deal with the two different technologies by having both a PI and a VLF detector, but it is certainly not necessary to own two detectors to be successful in finding gold.

A part of this decision does depend on the part of the country you live in – there is no one simple answer that is perfect for everyone. If you don’t know what kind of prospecting sites are near you and which type of detector might be best for that location, don’t rush things. Take your time and learn before you invest you money. Probably the best advice possible is to get the very finest detector you can possibly afford, even if you have to save up for a bit. Many new guys who have never prospected, enthusiastically decide to rush out to buy a VLF, but later regret it. They would be better off buying a $10 pan, and joining a prospecting club, taking their time and learning about prospecting for 6 months or a year while they save to buy PI detector, even if they end up with a used model.

Reno Chris

PS - Yep, I live in Reno too. The black Rock desert itself is probably NOT a good place to search. Gold doesnt just occur willy nilly all over the desert in some randomized fashion. Buy a couple books on placers in Nevada and study up to see where it has been found before.

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Hi All!!

Sorry it's taken me so long to get back here and reply, this old janitor some times has to slow down!

Thanks again for all the great input! Hammer, LAMAR and Reno Chris, you all are great to be so generous and helpful!

LAMAR - 4.7 onces? Wow! I bet you had to watch your back when you carry that much out! Nice going though!

Hammer - I thought the SD2100 was an IP machine, no?

Reno Chris - Thanks for all the juicy info! I have to read it over a couple of more times to get it all to sink in.:-) I am curious, however, with all the years that you've been at it, what's the biggest nugget you've ever found?

I saw where someone mentioned that a Gold Bug 2 will go down to 10-inches, that doesn't sound too bad to me; and I know I could afford one of those.

Does anyone know why someone doesn't just built an x-ray machine on wheels that one can run along the ground? I would think that would work way better than trying to discern by way of listening to sound waves, no?

Well, I gotta get a bit more sleep now before heading out to my graveshift janitor job. Again, thanks to all of you for your time and great comments!!!!!

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TheSearcher:

I have been prospecting for over 30 years and have not found any real huge nuggets - but perhaps that will change this summer - one never knows. On the other hand, last year I found a quarter ounce nugget using nothing but my eyeballs to see and a screwdriver to pop it loose from the bedrock. No dredge, no drywasher, no detector - you never know what you will find. The nugget was found at alocal swimming hole where area kids come to swim nearly every day. It had probably been there years before I noticed it.....

Here are my serious recomendations to you:

1. Have you been to Daryl Nelson's prospecting shop at 315 Claremont St. off Wells Ave.? If not, go by some day soon and spend some time. Buy a copy of Maureen Johnsons's Placer Deposits of Nevada - its like 8 bucks. Buy a gold pan if you dont already own one. Ask Daryl for info about joining the Comstock Prospectors Club. Daryl can show you metal detectors in person, but I'd recomend holding off on making a big purchase like that.

Daryl's website is here: http://www.renogoldpros.com/

2. Join the Comstock Prospectors. They are the local gold prospecting club and they have some good claims where you can freely prospect and their claims do have some good gold. They have claims both in the mother lode and in the desert areas of Nevada. Attend some of their outings to the claims. You will meet experienced folks who will help you learn about prospecting. It costs $65 to join but only $35 per year after that to remain a member.

3. Take this summer to learn about prospecting and save up your money. Perhaps you will decide you'd rather be dredging. Decide if prospecting is really something you'd be interested in. After spending some time learning, you'll be able to make a well informed decision as to how you want to proceed.

Chris

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Hi All!!

Sorry it's taken me so long to get back here and reply, this old janitor some times has to slow down!

Thanks again for all the great input! Hammer, LAMAR and Reno Chris, you all are great to be so generous and helpful!

LAMAR - 4.7 onces? Wow! I bet you had to watch your back when you carry that much out! Nice going though!

Hammer - I thought the SD2100 was an IP machine, no?

Reno Chris - Thanks for all the juicy info! I have to read it over a couple of more times to get it all to sink in.:-) I am curious, however, with all the years that you've been at it, what's the biggest nugget you've ever found?

I saw where someone mentioned that a Gold Bug 2 will go down to 10-inches, that doesn't sound too bad to me; and I know I could afford one of those.

Does anyone know why someone doesn't just built an x-ray machine on wheels that one can run along the ground? I would think that would work way better than trying to discern by way of listening to sound waves, no?

Well, I gotta get a bit more sleep now before heading out to my graveshift janitor job. Again, thanks to all of you for your time and great comments!!!!!

Searcher,

Under ideal conditions a Gold Bug 2 will go 10 inches maybe 12, but that would be pushing it. The average for Gold Bug 2 for myself has been 4-8 inches and it will find some very small gold. If you want to go with a vlf, talk to Rob or Bill and see what they have in a used minelab. I would perfer the Gold Bug 2 over a Whites. Please people, I'm use to the GB2 and my friends do have Whites. This was just a personal preference.

Bob

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Saying that a GB2 will go 10 inches is somewhat misleading, as it is dependant on the size of the gold you are detecting, how mineralized the soil, the coil you are using, etc.

Even at ideal conditions, 10 inches implies a very large nugget - like well over an ounce - a truely rare find. Only a few people on these forums have detected gold nuggets well over an ounce. Usually numbers like that are based on air tests and your VLF will not get equal performance in the field because of soil mineralization.

It also does not take into account highly mineralzed areas where detection depths would be much less. It does not take into account Hot Rocks that give repeated false targets.

An interesting article with depth charts for the GB2 can be found at:

http://www.akmining.com/mine/detgold.htm

Chris

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Saying that a GB2 will go 10 inches is somewhat misleading, as it is dependant on the size of the gold you are detecting, how mineralized the soil, the coil you are using, etc. 

Even at ideal conditions, 10 inches implies a very large nugget - like well over an ounce - a truely rare find. Only a few people on these forums have detected gold nuggets well over an ounce. Usually numbers like that are based on air tests and your VLF will not get equal performance in the field because of soil mineralization.

It also does not take into account highly mineralzed areas where detection depths would be much less. It does not take into account Hot Rocks that give repeated false targets. 

An interesting article with depth charts for the GB2 can be found at:

http://www.akmining.com/mine/detgold.htm

Chris

Chris,

Good link. Those numbers are apox. for me also. When I said ideal conditions, that would be pretty much a lab set up. Because I detect mostly bedrock for clean up work and tailings, I have been able to get 8 inches out of my GB2. What I have found surprising, is that they is not much difference between the coil sizes except the money they cost. Someday I know that drywashing will come to an end for me and I will move on to full time metal detecting. Good Luck in Moore's Creek. Hope that you find a nice bunch of gold.

Searcher, I hope I didn't give you false hope. Soil conditions are our worst enemy. The areas I prospect, the GB2 has responded the best for a VLF machine.

Bob

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The GBII is a fine machine. I didn't mean to sound so negative - Bob you know its strengths and weaknesses. Our friend here, the new prospector does not.

So what did you detect at 8 inches, gold or trash?

Just by way of a silly comparison, I can detect my suburban with my GP Extreme at almost 15 feet (but that suburban is probably more than 100 times larger than the biggest nugget ever found).

Chris

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The GBII is a fine machine. I didn't mean to sound so negative - Bob you know its strengths and weaknesses. Our friend here, the new prospector does not.

So what did you detect at 8 inches, gold or trash?

Just by way of a silly comparison, I can detect my suburban with my GP Extreme at almost 15 feet (but that suburban is probably more than 100 times larger than the biggest nugget ever found).

Chris

Ok Chris, You win :lol: , I had missed a .5dwt in my classifer. I found it in my tailings pile and it was 8 inches deep. Scared me, so I spent another hour raking and detecting my tailings.

I think that maybe the X-70 by minelab would be a good choice for a beginner.

One is for sure, if your GP Extreme picks up something at 15 feet, it's either a car or your in the history books with the biggest nugget. :D

Bob

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Hey guys --

A little while ago I took a good hour to write a looong reply and when I went to post it the icon shot back and said something about the server having a technical problem or that I might need to readjust my settings. (Not a lot for me to adjust because I'm using a simple MSNTV2 web box.)

Sooooooo I'll not rewrite it all over again, and just hope that I can at least get this post to work and thus let you know that I am beholden to your kindness and that I'll reread all the valuable stuff that you shared with me. Really sorry that I can't say more! THANKS!!!!!!!

Okay, stand back, here goes..........

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Hello All,

I am new to the forum and just wanted to say Hello. Also, Bob I think I lost that nugget when I was up to see you. Glad you found it... LOL... Jeff

Hello Jeff,

You know Doc and I talked about that very thing. We knew that we couldn't have missed it so we figured it must have been yours.

Bob

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