Another find


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I do believe I have found one of those oddities that a few other people have found. Here's a couple of pics of what looks like an old cartridge casing with the top crimped over. If you look at it with a glass, there is some sort of fiber wadding stuffed inside just poking out the edge. It's heavy too, 14 dwt exactly.

Can you experts out there identify the caliber or give me some background on it? It appears to be a 50 caliber, but with no ridge on the base to hold it in the chamber. There is a ring around the base and it's a rim fire. The top has been intentionally crimped.

I'm hoping it's full of gold but it could be just dirt. I'm tempted to open it and see if there's anything inside but at the same time I'd kinda like to keep it as it is for a conversation piece.

At any rate, I'd like to know more about it. Can anyone help?

Digger Bob

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Hi Bob The case on the left looks like a Henry rim fire, does it have an H stamped on the bottom? also they were .44 not 50 cal. As for the one on the right I have not a clue? but the weight is very suspicious. :) AzNuggetBob

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Morning Digger Bob: Without a doubt the cartridge case you found is a " Henry Case", BUT not all 44.cal Henry Brass cases have an "H" stamped on the head. I have several found around Rich Hill without an "H" stamp. One sure way to ID a Henry type case which has been fired in a Henry rifle is the 2 firing pin indentations 180 degrees apart on the edge of the the case rim.

Don

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Morning Digger Bob: Without a doubt the cartridge case you found is a " Henry Case", BUT not all 44.cal Henry Brass cases have an "H" stamped on the head. I have several found around Rich Hill without an "H" stamp. One sure way to ID a Henry type case which has been fired in a Henry rifle is the 2 firing pin indentations 180 degrees apart on the edge of the the case rim.

Don

The odd thing is, it's not stamped with any numbers or letters. And there appears to be only one place on the rim that is dented. Nothing opposite it. And even that one looks more like a scratch or dent rather than an intentional firing pin hit. In some ways it doesn't even look like a cartridge. More like a ordinary copper tube folded over.

By this weekend I won't be able to contain my curiosity any longer and will have to carefully pry it open and empty it. I'd like to be able to put it back together just like it was as a conversation piece... assuming it actually has gold in it! Otherwise, it's just a junk shell.

Digger

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Hi Bob...I just weighed one of my Henry's....2.1 DWT...Then I filled it with water...Totaled 3.2 DWT...My guess is you have about 11.9 DWT gold in a beat up cartridge that would be a perfect way to hide it :) ...Can't wait to see how it turns out....Cheers, Unc

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just put the cartridge in a vice. If the shell is containd it can not become a weapon. Turn the open end away from face and pry open. It will not go off just from prying open if you use something brass that will not spark you should be fine. I can't wait to see the gold inside this shell. I agree with Ron at that weight you have gold in that thing. I pick up every crimped shell in hopes it will be the one.

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Morning Ridge Runner: The .44 cal Henry was a rim fire cartridge and for some unknow to me reason the rifle had twin firing pins. It could be that in the early days ignition of the Henry primer was not 100% reliable thus the tywin firing pins. Or could it have been because firing pins often brioke on early day rifles?

Perhpas someone else has a better explanation for the double firing pins, if so I'd like to read their take.

Don

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Hi Bob...I just weighed one of my Henry's....2.1 DWT...Then I filled it with water...Totaled 3.2 DWT...My guess is you have about 11.9 DWT gold in a beat up cartridge that would be a perfect way to hide it :) ...Can't wait to see how it turns out....Cheers, Unc

Ron, that is JUST the information I needed! I have no idea what an empty case weighs or one filled with just dirt. So, even if it weighed 5 dwt filled with ordinary dirt, that leaves almost 10 dwt of possible gold. COOL!

I'll have to open it now for half an oz. I wouldn't bother for a few flakes.

I'll post the results on Monday. Thanks!

Digger

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Talk about suspense :blink: Sounds good Bob, but from my experience, expect the worse. That way you wont be dissapointed.

Hey, being an Aussie, when you talk about a "Henry" case, do you mean a Henry Martini cartridge? or Cadet as they are sometimes called.

Can't wait for the opening Bob.

Good luck.

Curley

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By my calculations to weigh a total of 14 DWT's assuming it is a 50. cal. rim fire case because it does look slightly larger than the .44 It would need to be: poured in lead a copper jacketed bullet, an amalgamated fine gold mercury blob or a single solid gold nugget that fit the case almost perfectly. I like a good mystery. :) AzNuggetBob

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Hi Curley as you can see I've already spent way to much time thinking about it myself. :lol: Got board so I tried to reverse engineer what may possibly be in that thing? I guess only Digger Bob has the answer. I don't think we are the only ones waiting. :D AzNuggetBob

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