EMI - solar cycle


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Last year we had quite a bit of activity and talk about broadly apparent EMI. Some of us suggested it may be related to solar cycle, sunspots, solar wind or even CMEs interacting with the magnetosphere. However, considering that not many have reported EMI of late and there has been heaps of solar activity (the largest sunspots and flares), I'm guessing it has not much to do with the magnetosphere, but more likely with the usual local phenomena - rain, storms, man-made EMI etc. The only other thought I had was that 2010 was close to the solar minimum and the magnetosphere contracted, perhaps relating to that peak in EMI talk on the forum last year.

Check out the large sun spots....

http://spaceweather.com/

Has anyone lately had persistent EMI, in areas where they don't usually?

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wow! mabe thats what was going on i was running a large mono all day and just couldnt tune out the "warbley" EMI for more than 30 seconds at a time. That big ball of fusion in the sky was beating down above average heat in greaterville too! :blink:

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wow! mabe thats what was going on i was running a large mono all day and just couldnt tune out the "warbley" EMI for more than 30 seconds at a time. That big ball of fusion in the sky was beating down above average heat in greaterville too! :blink:

BB - I think in Greaterville it's more of an issue with Border Patrol keying up on the radio. I could be totally wrong, did you see any BP in the area?

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Don't be so sure it local EMI. The entire Virgin Mobile broadband network went down yesterday only minutes after the X1 flare. ( it takes about 10 minutes for an xray burst to reach earth and 2 days for a CME to travel the same diatance) Some of you may remember the Canadian power outage in 1989 from solar flares. In 1859 a solar xray eruption set telegraph wires across the US on fire from the power surge. Clearly, these events generate enough energy to cause your detector to go on the fritz.

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Don't be so sure it local EMI. The entire Virgin Mobile broadband network went down yesterday only minutes after the X1 flare. ( it takes about 10 minutes for an xray burst to reach earth and 2 days for a CME to travel the same diatance) Some of you may remember the Canadian power outage in 1989 from solar flares. In 1859 a solar xray eruption set telegraph wires across the US on fire from the power surge. Clearly, these events generate enough energy to cause your detector to go on the fritz.

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