Why no 4800s?


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Hello All,

I was just wondering is there something undesireable about the 4800s or is it that the 5000s were introduced at the same time and why go with the lessor model.

The reason I'm curious is because I am about to purchase a used 4800 for a great price and I want to make sure I don't make an expensive mistake.

How do they compare to the 4500 in smoothness, depth and sensitivity?

Thanks for any replies.

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The 48's are fine and are an incremental step up from the 45's. What makes the 5000's (and the 48) better is the extra timings, with fine gold the notable one (on the 5000 only).

I know some folks complain about what they call "drip feed" improvements to Minelabs PI line. But in this game drips are gallons and inches are miles.

IMHO this one timing (fine gold) makes the 5000 worth the price.

If I had to choose between a 45 and a 48 I'd take the 48. The reason is that the 48 shares the same circuitry and software as the 5000. This makes it a bit smoother then the 45. Also some of the variable settings have a "finer adjustment range" then the 45.

Regardless of which one you choose from the 45 on all 3 models are smooth and very sensitive.

FWIW there were 2 milestones in Minelab PI's the SD 2000 and the GPX 4500.

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Regardless of which one you choose from the 45 on all 3 models are smooth and very sensitive.

FWIW there were 2 milestones in Minelab PI's the SD 2000 and the GPX 4500.

Very good report Chris. I thought the big milestones were the SD-2000(MPS), GP-Extreme(DVT), and GPX-4000(the GPX-4000 does not have SETA, is the GPX-4500 that much of a breakthrough being better with SETA??).

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Hello Retorted,

There are a few more features on the GPX-5000 then mentioned over the GPX-4800. The GPX-4800 seems to be a fairly slow mover over the GPX-5000. I think most figure if they are going to spend $5,000+ they are going for the best with more features overall.

For starters, the GPX-5000 comes with an additional coil, which is valued at nearly $300 (Commander 11-inch Round Mono).

The GPX-5000 also has more timings, 8 vs. 6 on the GPX-4800. The GPX-5000 does have the Fine Gold Timing, which is a timing that many are using with great success.

The GPX-5000 also has more detect modes. The 4800 has three, general, deep and hi-mineral. The GPX-5000 has six, general, deep, hi-mineral, patch, hi-trash and pinpoint.

The GPX-5000 has 4 audio modes, the GPX-4800 has three (lacking the Boost mode).

The GPX-5000 has more ground balancing modes, including the "Specific" mode.

The GPX-5000 has a RX Gain range of 1-20, the GPX-4800 has a range of 1-15. More adjustment and power for the GPX-5000.

With the additional searchcoil and added features the user has to make the determination if it's worth it. Keep in mind also, if you purchase a GPX-5000, dealers like myself include nearly $1,000 in free accessories (bundle package), but is not included with the GPX-4800.

Hope this helps a bit,

Rob Allison

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Thanks Rob,

Good info.

With the 4800 being a 4500+, I think it will suit me well.

The 4800 I'm picking up is priced as high as I can go right now. Perhaps with a bit of good fortune, I can make it pay for itself then work towards a future upgrade.

I can't wait to hit those areas where my Tdi pulled out some nice nuggets.

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Are you saying that the 5000 has 25% more RX gain?

No, It doesnt have any more gain, its just divided up into finer increment adjustments. The other thing people get hung up on is that on say, your television, you can hardly hear it at a volume gain of 1, but at 30 its too loud, The gain on the GPX detectors isnt like that. At one you are getting most of the gain possible. going from one to 20 on a 5000 increases the gain only a little (I forget but its like 20 or 25% increase to go from one to 20).

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Hello Guys,

Funny you mentioned the "Gains" as I have used them both side by side with "Gains" full out (20 vs. 15). At that point, both units were unstable, the GPX-5000 had a slightly louder response, but I agree with Chris that it's more of a fine adjustment. As an example we will use just Decibles as something to measure -

Both units have 100 decibles, but one machine can adjust that from 1-15, another from 1-20. So the GPX-4800 going from a Gain of 1 to 2 will have an adjustment of 6.66 decibles per number moved up to 100 decibles at a Gain of 15. The GPX-5000 has 5 decibles from a Gain of 1 to 2, so it has a much finer adjustment overall.

I'm just using the above as an example, but you can see how more range will give you a finer and maybe more stable adjustment of Gain.

Hope this helps,

Rob Allison

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