Yikes! Snakes!


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On another forum a guy posted a note that he'd bought a deer lease in, I think, South Carolina...He went in one time and had one of the worst experiences of his life...He was offering the deer lease free to anyone who wanted it...Gives me the creeps... The big AZ is a safety zone compared to this... Cheers, Unc

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Ron,

I live in South Carolina and these snakes didn't live or die in South Carolina, I seen a lot of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes which are in South Carolina and I have caught my share of them alive and relocated them, I'm the neighborhood snakeman, the snakes in the pictures are Western Diamondbacks, the white coloration at the tail is a dead give away, Eastern Diamondbacks do not have this white coloration at the tail, these pictures were taken out west somewhere, either way not a good place to going walking around!!!

Looks like some good eating thought, rattlesnake taste like chicken!!

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Hey Uncle Ron,

The last two weekend out I have had guests that have purchased detector and accessories from me. During these outings we have seen a handful of Rattlesnakes. When I was out with DigDeep and Co. I walked them around the area showing them potential areas to nuggetshoot. During our walk we ran into a very larger, Pink Rattlesnake and then later down in the main gulch we crossed another Diamondback in the tall grass. When I drove home that weekend I seen two crossing the road. Last weekend I also seen another two crossing the road, one on the way in and one on the way out.

The Rattlesnakes are out, so make sure you're paying close attention. I also recommend a good pair of Snake Gaitors (pictured below) during this time of year to give you added protection. I think they are well worth their weight in gold. For $62.00 these Gaitors will last you years.

snakeguards.jpg

P.S. Is the Pink Rattlesnake just a common Western Diamondback? What I noticed is that most of the Pink ones I see lack the "Coontail" bands around the tail, which makes me think it might be a Tiger Rattler.

Take care,

Rob Allison

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Hey Uncle Ron,

The last two weekend out I have had guests that have purchased detector and accessories from me. During these outings we have seen a handful of Rattlesnakes. When I was out with DigDeep and Co. I walked them around the area showing them potential areas to nuggetshoot. During our walk we ran into a very larger, Pink Rattlesnake and then later down in the main gulch we crossed another Diamondback in the tall grass. When I drove home that weekend I seen two crossing the road. Last weekend I also seen another two crossing the road, one on the way in and one on the way out.

The Rattlesnakes are out, so make sure you're paying close attention. I also recommend a good pair of Snake Gaitors (pictured below) during this time of year to give you added protection. I think they are well worth their weight in gold. For $62.00 these Gaitors will last you years.

snakeguards.jpg

I've never seen pink rattlers are they the girls ?

Why did the rattle snake cross the road ?

to get to the chicken ?

P.S. Is the Pink Rattlesnake just a common Western Diamondback? What I noticed is that most of the Pink ones I see lack the "Coontail" bands around the tail, which makes me think it might be a Tiger Rattler.

Take care,

Rob Allison

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A little tip that will make your gaiters 200% better.

These gaiters come with instructions that say, adjust the straps so they fit, and then before you snap the plastic buckle together twist the 1 inch nylon web so they keep their adjustment. My experience is, it doesn't work.

If you happen to rub up against brush, and the brush pulls at the webbing they become looser and looser, and it gets annoying.

Buy yourself 4 1 inch plastic ladder lock pieces. It's just a little plastic adjustment piece. Take the buckles off the strap, put the ladder lock on, put the buckle back on adjust it, then put the end through the ladder lock again. PRESTO, it is perfectly adjusted and you will never have to adjust it again, it stays put.

Second hint. Don't put them on tight. It's not necessary. They are extremely comfortable tight or not, but the difference is, when you have them on tight your legs sweat like crazy. If you leave them a little loose it allows a like convection of cool air pulled from the ground, as the hot air escapes out the top.

These are so comfortable I wear them year round, because they also protect you against the cactus. Nothing like swinging along, when you just realize you had a subtle target a swing and a half ago, so you take two steps backwards and bury the tip of a "Spanish Sword Hard Tipped Yucca Catcus" into the calf of your leg.

Or worse yet you step backwards into a quiet rattler under a bush that nails you in the leg.

As for someones comment that very few adults die from a rattlesnake bite, WHO CARES? I suppose very few men would die if they got their wang cut off, but that doesn't mean you leave it hanging out when you are chopping up chicken using a meat cleaver.

Also, while rattlers have hemotoxins, the Mojave Green, which Gold Basin Arizona is full of, has venom akin to COBRA venom. It is a mixture of Hemotoxins and Neurotoxins. Last I knew there is not anti-venin that addresses both of these toxins. When my good friend was alive, Plaz Conner, he had his two Jack Russel terriers with him. They both got bitten by the same Mojave Green. The male dog died at the scene, and the female barely made it as he rushed her to the vet, and he gave them both shots of anti-venin at the scene as he used to carry it with him.

So BCOT!

Doc

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Hey Uncle Ron,

The last two weekend out I have had guests that have purchased detector and accessories from me. During these outings we have seen a handful of Rattlesnakes. When I was out with DigDeep and Co. I walked them around the area showing them potential areas to nuggetshoot. During our walk we ran into a very larger, Pink Rattlesnake and then later down in the main gulch we crossed another Diamondback in the tall grass. When I drove home that weekend I seen two crossing the road. Last weekend I also seen another two crossing the road, one on the way in and one on the way out.

The Rattlesnakes are out, so make sure you're paying close attention. I also recommend a good pair of Snake Gaitors (pictured below) during this time of year to give you added protection. I think they are well worth their weight in gold. For $62.00 these Gaitors will last you years.

snakeguards.jpg

P.S. Is the Pink Rattlesnake just a common Western Diamondback? What I noticed is that most of the Pink ones I see lack the "Coontail" bands around the tail, which makes me think it might be a Tiger Rattler.

Take care,

Rob Allison

Could be a Tiger, here is a link to Arizona's Rattlesnakes...

http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/arizona-rattlesnakes.shtml#7

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